Digital Daily Dozen 9/27/16

Why Snapchat’s Spectacles Can Succeed Where Google Glass Failed 

Glassholes, rejoice! Your hopes and dreams are about to be fulfilled by a $129 pair of video-recording Spectacles that its creator calls a “toy.” But while they are going to be super-fun to play with, Snap Inc.’s Spectacles are a serious brand extension for the company that created ephemeral visual conversation.

http://adage.com/article/guest-columnists/snapchat-s-spectacles-succeed-google-glass-failed/306013/

 

 

Groups Lodge Political File Complaint at FCC

Saying the FCC is doing “absolutely nothing” to enforce the law on disclosure of the sponsors of political ads, the Campaign Legal Center, joined by the Benton Foundation and the Sunlight Foundation, has filed a complaint with the FCC against Scripps’ WCPO-TV Cincinnati.

http://www.broadcastingcable.com/news/washington/groups-lodge-political-file-complaint-fcc/159903

 

 

Liberman Asks FCC to Reconsider Comcast Complaint Dismissal 

Liberman Broadcasting, parent of Spanish-language network Estrella TV, has asked the FCC’s Media Bureau to reconsider its decision to reject Liberman’s program carriage complaint against Comcast for lack of standing, saying to read a TV broadcast station out of the definition of video programming vendor is illegal.

http://www.broadcastingcable.com/news/washington/liberman-asks-fcc-reconsider-comcast-complaint-dismissal/159910

 

 

Bridging the Digital (Veteran) Divide 

Rep. Jerry McNerney has introduced a bill to boost broadband access for veterans, saying they should not be left behind in the push for broadband adoption. McNerney is a member of both the House Communications and Veterans Affairs subcommittees.

http://www.broadcastingcable.com/news/washington/bridging-digital-veteran-divide/159909

 

 

Who won the debate? Social media and ‘The Cyber’

So who won the debate? Social media, in a landslide. While presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump slugged it out for 90 minutes, touching briefly on cybersecurity, Facebook and Twitter racked up huge numbers of posts and tweets, to borrow a favorite word from one of the debate participants.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2016/09/26/social-media-undisputed-winner-debate/91121390/

 

 

Cutting the Cord: Twitter’s NFL kickoff is good 

Twitter has successfully kicked off its Thursday Night Football streaming broadcasts. But how much teaming up with the NFL will help flush out new users is an open question. Twitter’s Sept. 15 showing of the New York Jets-Buffalo Bills game drew 2.1 million viewers, plus another 200,000 if you add in the pre-game show.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/columnist/2016/09/27/cutting-cord-twitter-nfl-tnf-thursday-night-football/90445594/

 

 

People Who Subscribe to Streaming Services Watch Fewer Channels, Study Finds

There are more TV channels to watch than ever, but just because they’ve been built doesn’t mean viewers are coming. In fact, households that subscribe to subscription video on demand services (SVOD), such as Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime, tend to watch one fewer channel per month than households without these services.

http://promaxbda.org/brief/content/people-who-subscribe-to-streaming-services-watch-fewer-channels-study-finds

 

 

Advertisers, Publishers Look For Ways to Counter Facebook and Google

It’s not just publishers complaining that platforms like Facebook and Google are “eating the world.” Lately, advertisers and media technology executives also say they’re trying to make sure those giants, and to a lesser extent Snapchat, Apple, Amazon and Twitter don’t control all the dollars and data that flow to media and ads.

http://mediashift.org/2016/09/advertisers-publishers-look-ways-counter-facebook-google/

 

 

Average Monthly Broadband Usage is 190 Gigabytes Monthly Per Household 

Average monthly broadband usage in US homes is 190 gigabytes per month, according to a new report from iGR Research. More than 95% of this traffic is video. “TV has become a personal activity,” said Iain Gillott, president of iGR research. “If you have four people in a household now, that means four times the data going in.”

http://www.telecompetitor.com/igr-average-monthly-broadband-usage-is-190-gigabytes-monthly-per-household/

 

 

Messaging Apps Vary Widely When It Comes to Privacy 

When it comes to users’ privacy, messaging apps can vary widely—a fact that came to a head when Alphabet’s Google released its new Allo app. The messenger performs novel tricks like suggesting what to say next, but it does it by analyzing the contents of users’ messages.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/messaging-apps-vary-widely-when-it-comes-to-privacy-1474920203

 

 

Privacy isn’t dead. Here’s why  (Commentary)

Joseph Gordon-Levitt may have a charming smile, but the “Snowden” biopic in which he’s currently starring is still pretty frightening. Whether you agree with Edward Snowden’s actions or not, the scale of classified information the former NSA contractor leaked provided a stark reminder that our privacy is under attack.

http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Passcode/Passcode-Voices/2016/0926/Opinion-Privacy-isn-t-dead.-Here-s-why

 

 

Traditional TV Viewing Slips, But Dominates Video Use

Although traditional TV viewing — live and DVR use — has slipped to some extent over recent years, it is still the dominant way that viewers consume video. In the first quarter of this year, consumers 18+ spent on average 35 hours and 26 minutes weekly with traditional TV (live and DVR), according to new research.

http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/285582/traditional-tv-viewing-slips-but-dominates-video.html

 

 

New California IMDb Age Law Probably Unconstitutional, Experts Say 

A new California law that will require IMDb to omit or remove age and birthdates from an actor’s profile upon request is likely unconstitutional, a half-dozen lawyers and law professors have told The Hollywood Reporter in the two days since its enactment, citing First Amendment concerns.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr-esq/new-california-imdb-age-law-932808

 

 

 

 

The Digital Daily Dozen is distributed weekdays (usually) by Dom Caristi as a service of the BSU Digital Policy Institute. The articles are culled from various e-newsletters. The content is not original – only their compilation in this mailing is.