Digital Daily Dozen 10/22/15

Report: For Every $3 Spent on Digital Ads, Fraud Takes $1 (Ad Age)

As digital spend continues to reach landmark highs — it hit $27.5 billion for the first half of 2015 – so does ad fraud, which is now estimated to cost the industry about $18.5 billion annually, according to a report released by Distil Networks in collaboration with the Interactive Advertising Bureau and the Trustworthy Accountability Group. 

Who Should Prevent Social Media Harassment? (Inside Higher Ed) 

On Wednesday 72 women’s and civil rights organizations urged the Education Department to tell colleges that they must monitor anonymous apps like Yik Yak — frequently the source of sexist and racist comments about named or identifiable students — and do something to protect those students who are named.     

Sling TV Will Add Broadcast Nets ‘When They’re Ready’ (Broadcasting & Cable) 

Sling CEO Roger Lynch said the Dish-owned “skinny bundle” service expects to add broadcast networks to its lineup, but not in the short term. “It’s a complicated market,” he said during a wide-ranging discussion. “To some extent, [networks] aren’t ready.” 

New Accessibility Deadlines Coming Soon (Broadcasting Law Blog) 

TV stations have in the past few years been hit with many requirements for making their programming — especially emergency information — accessible to all people within their service areas. Two deadlines loom in the very short term that stations need to remember. 

BEING PRO-BUSINESS DOESN’T MEAN HANGING CONSUMERS OUT TO DRY  (QZ- Commentary)  

Monthly prices for high-speed broadband are far higher on average in some major American cities than in Toronto, London, and Tokyo. In part, that’s because most of our communities are subject to local monopolies for service. Three-quarters of US households have at most one option for purchasing Internet service. 

LEAP BROADBAND LIBRARY PROGRAM TARGETS FIVE STATES (Telecompetitor) 

Five states will take part in a two-year initiative that aims to develop strategies to increase broadband capacity to local libraries. The Library E-rate Assessment Planning initiative, spearheaded by the American Library Association and the Chief Officers of State Library Agencies, will focus on Alaska, California, Iowa, Kentucky and No. Dakota. 

HOMELAND SECURITY WILL NOW GET WARRANTS FOR STINGRAY SURVEILLANCE (The Verge)

The Department of Homeland Security has a new, more constitutional policy for cell-site simulators, also known as Stingrays. The new policy follows in the footsteps of the previously announced Justice Department policy, requiring explicit warrants for the deployment of the technology, except in exceptions already made by the 4th  Amendment.    

Comcast Moves Closer to Offering Cell Service, Activates Deal With Verizon (Recode) 

Comcast is getting closer to entering the cellphone business. In recent months, the cable giant notified Verizon it intends to exercise its option to resell cellular service using the carrier’s network, according to a source familiar with the company’s plans. Comcast and several other cable operators got the option several years back.    

Twitter Says It Reaches More Than One Billion People, Wants Tweets Everywhere (Recode) 

Prepare to see a lot more tweets in a lot more places. Syndication was a major theme of Twitter’s second annual developer conference, where the company rolled out nearly two dozen new updates and features. Most of those tools are specific to developers (shocker!) but there were a few that should catch your attention.  

Jay Z Wins Copyright Trial Over Egyptian “Big Pimpin” Sample (Hollywood Reporter) 

Jay Z’s got 99 problems, but an unfavorable verdict in the trial over his hit “Big Pimpin’ ” ain’t one. Judge Christina Snyder found the nephew of Egyptian composer Baligh Hamdi did not have standing to pursue the claim that Jay Z and producer Tim “Timbaland” Mosley illicitly sampled his uncle’s song “Khosara Khosara.”  

CBS Radio Has Novel Argument to Legal Demand to Stop Playing Pre-1972 Songs (Hollywood Reporter) 

These past couple years, the broadcast industry has been unsettled by word that stations might not have an unfettered right to publicly perform pre-1972 sound recordings. The concern heightened after a judge shocked much of the industry by giving Flo & Eddie of The Turtles a win in a lawsuit against SiriusXM.  

DHS Secretary to Senate: Pass CISA (Inside Sources) 

Leaders in Congress and the heads of government agencies made a renewed push to pass the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA) Wednesday, and claimed the bill is essential to filling in a critical intelligence gap that will help prevent future cyber and terror attacks. 

 Maybe You Should Stop Calling It ‘Mobile’?  (Media Post- Commentary) 

Maybe, just maybe, it’s time you stop referring to the mobile industry as “mobile,” because you’re simply perpetuating a silo of thought that no longer applies. Think about it. This is the year mobile time spent and ad spending surpassed what we have lovingly referred to as “desktop” for so many years.